Theatre in Lockdown

We are now in week eight of lockdown here in the UK, and I can safely say I have watched more theatre than ever before. There is so much on offer, from the National Theatre, the RSC, the Globe, Andrew Lloyd Webber, Complicite, and many many other sources, West End and fringe.

Barber Shop 2

nationaltheatre.org.uk

Streamed theatre is no substitute for the real thing, obviously, despite the deftness of the filming. But it does have one big advantage: it’s global. Punters from all over the world can watch our NT’s plays along with us, or Lloyd Webber’s shows on YouTube. Andrew Scott in Sea Wall can be viewed by anyone – see the links below – as can Forced Entertainment’s improvised spoof Zoom meetings. And lockdown has produced some remarkably innovating and enterprising ideas, from dancers, singers, musicians, sports commentators and, of course, actors. ITV recently transmitted ISOLATION STORIES, four short plays about the stresses and strains experienced by various households in lockdown, featuring real-life fathers and sons, and a heavily-pregnant – in life and on TV – Sheridan Smith, filmed by the actors themselves, and all written, performed, edited and transmitted in less than two months.  An unprecedented (if you’ll excuse the overused word) achievement in the unprecedented situation we all find ourselves in.

Personally speaking, holed up on my own as I am, I have found the breadth and speed and variety of this extraordinary creativity hugely inspiring and immensely comforting. Theatres are facing a pretty grim future. They need packed audiences to keep going at the best of times, and God knows when they will be fully back in action. Theatre companies have been hugely generous streaming shows for free, with requests for donations to performers’ fundraising sites. Lloyd Webber’s shows raised £500,000 in donations to Acting for Others – the major fundraising site in the UK representing 14 charities. Cameron Mackintosh’s Foundation donated £100,000.  The National Theatre’s first streamed show One Man Two Guvnors raised £50,000 (I don’t know how much money subsequent shows have raised). The musical Eugenius raised over £15,000. Individual performers have raised several thousands by organising streamed performances from fellow artists and musicians, including musical directors.

Whether or not the dreaded Covid19 has or will change the face of theatre permanently remains to be seen. But for a spontaneous outburst of extraordinary creativity it is – and there really is no other word for it – unprecedented.

NB: I am posting regular updates on streamed shows on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/patsy.trench
But at the time of writing this (19 May) here are links to some of the shows on offer now:

ACTING FOR OTHERS: https://www.actingforothers.co.uk/

NT At Home:  https://www.nationaltheatre.org.uk/nt-at-home
Complicité:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCf3g9LOkCr5qqWUxMEz97eQ
Sea Wall:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j01kVmBoJW0
The Globe:  https://globeplayer.tv/ (£4.99 to rent)
Forced Entertainment:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVDgqloH420

© Patsy Trench
19 May, London, UK

 

 

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