London in Tier 2 lockdown

Wow, the rules change every minute. Tier 2 lockdown means we can only socialise with one other household in our ‘bubble’, and as far as I can tell we are allowed one bubble only.

However, the THEATRE goes on. I have so far come across THREE very different productions of A CHRISTMAS CAROL opening in the next month or so.

THE BRIDGE THEATRE is presenting a three-person version of the story devised and directed by Nicholas Hytner and featuring Simon Russell Beale, Patsy Ferran and Eben Figueiredo. It runs from 27 November to 16 January. Bookings open 20 October. https://bridgetheatre.co.uk/

THE OLD VIC’s version is part of their ‘In camera’ season, which means it will be performed in an empty theatre and streamed live all over the world. This is Matthew Warchus’ ‘big-hearted, smash hit production of Charles Dickens’ immortal classic’ adapted by Jack Thorne. Bookings open in November. https://www.oldvictheatre.com/whats-on/2020/old-vic-in-camera/a-christmas-carol-5

THE DOMINION THEATRE is presenting ‘a socially distanced production of Alan Menken, Lynn Ahrens and Mike Ockrent’s A Christmas Carol musical’ from the beginning of December 2020, with Brian Connelly as Scrooge. ‘The production will feature a symphonic 24 piece orchestra and an all-star West End cast, with over 50 artists set to be on stage.’ It sounds ambitious, though I’m not sure what a ‘symphonic 24 piece orchestra is’.  https://www.whatsonstage.com/shows/west-end-theatre/a-christmas-carol_235143 Tkts from £33.75.

It seems that theatres will keep running as long as they are able to, even if London goes into a fiercer lockdown. Light on the horizon perhaps.

Patsy Trench
October 2020

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Theatre in lockdown part three: THE OLD VIC

My latest theatre experience involved a one-to-one with actor Andrew Scott. We were suitably distanced – he in an empty Old Vic Theatre in south London and me in my flat in north London. At 7.30pm on the dot on Friday 4 September, me at my dining table, he on a bare stage, he told me the story of his father.

It was just him and me, and several cameras, and the buzz before and the applause after of an (imaginary) audience. Because of the nature of the play it felt suitably intimate in a way it would not have done had I been sitting in the theatre some distance from him. He spoke to me directly about the father he met for the first time when he was eight years old: a womanising, charismatic, feckless Irishman and an absentee father. In lesser hands he might have seemed like a cliche. But there was nothing cliched about Three Kings, either in the writing – Stephen Beresford – or the performance.

I confess I’ve had doubts about Andrew Scott in recent times. I didn’t like his Gary Essendine in Present Laughter, and I felt overall he was becoming a tad too mannered. But here he is on the top of his form: thoughtful, versatile, emotional, wry – he inhabits several characters, including his father, his (English) half-brother, his father’s ex, and himself at eight, seamlessly – and in total command. To perform live, to camera, in close-up, for an hour, alone, is as tough as it gets. I was riveted from start to finish.

Andrew Scott (oldvictheatre.com)

The production was viewed, and reviewed, around the world. It was also ‘sold out’. How a streamed play can be ‘sold out’ is a mystery, and a missed opportunity on the part of the Old Vic, it seems to me.

Next up at the Old Vic is Faith Healer, by Brian Friel, featuring Michael Sheen, David Threlfall and Indira Varma. Same clunky booking procedure (you log on, and then you wait. You don’t have to sit by the computer and you can log out of the booking page but you need to be on hand when your turn arises, which could be many hours later), but undoubtedly worth the effort.

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Theatre is nothing if not creative. You can also book to see, in person, Sleepless: A Musical Romance, playing at the Troubadour Theatre in Wembley until 27 September. Tickets hereThe Bridge Theatre is presenting Beat the Devil, a one-man play by David Hare about his personal experiences of contracting Covid19, featuring Ralph Fiennes. I tried to book one seat for this but the computer said No. (A victim of socially-distanced seats.) And now all performances are sold out. The National Theatre is producing a one-man play called Death of England: Delroy, a sequel to Death of England, written by Clint Dyer and Roy Williams and featuring actor Giles (Aaron Burr from Hamilton) Terera some time in late October in a socially-distanced Olivier Theatre. More info here.

All is not quite lost.