THEATRE IN LOCKDOWN part two – BIRDSONG

The lockdown caused by Covid19 has produced some remarkable innovations on the part of performers, directors, writers and producers. In addition to ISOLATION STORIES (see my previous blog), there has been a similar series called UNPRECEDENTED, the glorious (if slightly niche) STAGED, starring Michael Sheen and David Tennant (or David Tennant and Michael Sheen) and a rehash of Alan Bennett’s TALKING HEADS, all of which have been produced during lockdown, with social distancing, and are being shown on our TV.

In the theatre, the OLD VIC has produced a live social-distanced production of the play LUNGS, performed in the theatre to an empty auditorium by Claire Foy and Matt Smith. Their rather cumbersome booking procedure proved to be too much for me, but it was obviously a huge success as they kept adding performances, and hopefully the income will go some way towards assuring the Old Vic’s future. Performing till 4 July, tickets available for 4 July only here: https://www.oldvictheatre.com/availability/lungs-in-camera

Lungs online (theguardian.com)

But surely the most remarkable achievement of all has to be Original Theatre’s online lockdown production of BIRDSONG. Adapted from Sebastian Faulks’ novel by Rachel Wagstaff from her stage version, this full-length production was created by actors in isolation filming in their own homes, in full costume and makeup, in front of ‘green screens’. We only ever see one actor at a time, but the interaction between them is so realistic you forget they are not in the same room, or trench. Backgrounds are superimposed on top of their bookshelves (or green screens), and sound effects were added in post production. For a glimpse into how they did it, see here: https://originaltheatreonline.com/.

The cast of BIRDSONG online (theatreweekly.com)

Which only goes to show despite the current dire circumstances, and a certain lack of support on the part of our government, you can never ever keep a good creative down.

BIRDSONG is screening until 4 July in the UK only. Tickets cost £15. For bookings, go here: https://www.birdsongonline.co.uk/

 

 

 

 

Coronavirus 2 – Uncle Vanya

Following my blog of a few days ago checking out theatre streaming sites while we’re all confined to barracks, I’ve been looking further into what’s on offer – more details at the end of this blog – and I began by dipping into Digital Theatre. (https://www.digitaltheatre.com/consumer/productions)

Digital Theatre has been going for some time, and their large catalogue includes shows from the National Theatre, the West End, the fringe, and overseas. Like NT Live the shows are filmed live, with an audience, so you do have to remember the performances – and on occasion the makeup – are larger than life.

I’m not used to streaming and I encountered a few problems: the speech was out of sync – not so important when you’re relying on subtitles – and on occasion the picture would freeze as my internet connection struggled to keep up. Also the website has no search function, and if you watch the show over two days, as I did, unlike Netflix – which remembers what you were watching and how far you got – you have to start from scratch and fast forward.

I began with the Vakhtanger Theatre production of Uncle Vanya, filmed live in Russia in 2010. I have a particular soft spot for this play as it marked my first significant appearance in professional theatre – Harrogate Rep in the ‘60s – playing Sonya. Sonya is the young, plain, idealistic, passionate, pure-hearted girl who works her socks off alongside her disillusioned uncle to keep the family property going. She is naïve to a fault and deeply in love with the neighbouring Dr Astrov, another disillusioned soul, who is barely aware of her existence. I identified with Sonya wholeheartedly, and in the course of my 20-year long career as an actress it was the most rewarding role I ever played.

digitaltheatrecompany.com

The Vakhtanger production, highly praised when it appeared in the West End in 2012, is self-consciously stylised, indulgent, occasionally histrionic, sometimes annoying and often riveting. Played on an almost bare stage with a full moon glowing in the dark background, it reminded me at times of Complicite shows of the 1980s. I personally prefer my Chekov lower-key, and without the perpetual music; and the best moments for me were the quieter and more personal scenes between, say, Yelena and Sonya patching up their quarrel, and the joshing, painfully poignant farewell between Yelena and Astrov. The London production closed down the day before I was due to see it, and I’ve been in mourning ever since. So this went some way towards making up for it.

~~~~~

Next on my calendar tonight for home watching is Mark Thomas’s Check up: Our NHS @ 70, courtesy of the Arcola Theatre. (Available until 28 March, pay what you can.) https://www.gofasterstripe.com/cgi-bin/website.cgi?page=videofull&id=38659

Thursday 26 March: The Habit of Art.  Showing at 8.15pm, courtesy of The Original Theatre – www.originaltheatreonline.com. A touring production filmed live. Pre-bookable. Cost £3 or more. They are also streaming The Croft on Friday 27 March, but I am booked on that date to see

Delux by Ballet Boyz courtesy of Sadlers Wells. https://www.sadlerswells.com/whats-on/2020/digital-stage/ Available at 7.30pm on Friday 27 March: ‘the same time the work was due to be performed in our theatre. It will be available to watch on the Sadler’s Wells Facebook page as the first in our weekly series of Sadler’s Wells Facebook Premieres.’

Patsy Trench
25 March 2020